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Addiction and Responsibility

Addiction to drugs and/or alcohol is a very cunning, baffling and powerful disease. It renders the suffering person essentially useless when it comes to living day to day in a responsible manner. In fact, most of the time the person lives a life that is detrimental to not only themselves but to those closest to the them. Often, the person is incapable of living life on life’s terms, working and being a member of society as a whole. The person in the depths of addiction lives to use and uses to live.

A person in active addiction becomes incapable of taking responsibility for themselves or anyone else. To the contrary, they will most likely blame everyone and everything for their current circumstances. It’s just the nature of the disease. Areas of the brain responsible for decision making are largely blocked. Primitive areas of the brain are running the show. The addicted brain and body want more of the addictive substance or substances.

Withdrawal

The physical addiction turns into a need and, without the substances, a person may go into violent withdrawal and may even die as a result. A person in this state will do almost anything to keep using, including stealing, selling themselves for sexual favors or much worse. This behavior is the polar opposite of someone who is responsible.

You may ask how is it possible that such a person can actually blame everyone and everything else for the problems they have created? The answer is simple. Addiction is a wicked disease, and the side effects are abhorrent behaviors that damage not only themselves but those closest to them. This damage is often emotional, psychological and often physical.

 

Not a bad person

Remember, key areas of the brain are blocked including the areas required to distinguish the truth from the false. However, as difficult as it may be, it is very important to realize and understand the following – this is not a bad person that needs to become good, this is a very sick person who needs to become well.

The side effects for treatment of cancer and other diseases can be very painful, such as nausea, loss of hair, mood swings and worse. Paradoxically, the side effects from the effective treatment for the disease of addiction are positive – a happy and useful life. That said, the first step for most people to get well is to admit they have a problem. This requires taking responsibility for treating their disease and repairing the damage that was done in active addiction.

 

Realization is a key

Most people in recovery find tremendous freedom in learning to accept responsibility for their disease and their lives. People who successfully recovery normally have something along the lines of an epiphany. They realize that if everyone were to blame for their problems, they would likely not get well. This is because they cannot change anyone else. However, they can change themselves. Here’s the key. If a person recovering from active addiction realizes that if they change themselves and their thinking, their chances will be much better than prior to active addiction.

In stressful times like these, many people across the world are worried how they are going to put food on the table for their families. Thus, it is more important than ever that those needing help reach out to private or publicly funded treatment centers. This will help relieve the stress that the family and friends of the suffering individual are already going through.

The suffering addict has a disease that can only be treated by that person taking responsibility for their disease and their actions. The first step on the journey to recovery is to take responsibility, admit they have a problem and get the help they need.

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